Copycat Law

Note: this is not legal advice. This is my opinion, nothing more. If you want legal advice, hire a lawyer. Update July 16, 2010 – I’ve said all along that actual incorporation of code makes “the work is probably derivative, and the GPL probably applies.” With that in mind, please go read Andrew Nacin’s post […]

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Update Please check out the companion piece to this article, Why the GPL/Derivative Work debate doesn’t matter for WordPress themes July 16, 2010 – I’ve said all along that actual incorporation of code makes “the work is probably derivative, and the GPL probably applies.” With that in mind, please go read Andrew Nacin’s post about […]

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I knew that WordPress itself was covered by the GPL. What I didn’t know was that themes, even commercial themes, built to run on WordPress, also fall under the GPL, according to some GPL experts. In this vid, Matt Mullenweg talks about the benefits of the GPL at some length, even going so far as […]

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No takebacks Last month, the official White House photo stream on Flickr switched from a Creative Commons attribution license to a brand-new “U.S. Government Work license” that Flickr created specially for this photostream, but which probably applies to almost all photos contributed by the federal government. Why create a brand-new “license”? Because works of the […]

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Write for a blog long enough, it’s bound to happen. You see a link in your referrer logs, find something on Google, get an email from a reader… you follow the link, and there it is: your hard work, spread across someone else’s page, used as bait for ad revenue or something worse. David Risley […]

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I wrote almost exactly a year ago about the lawsuit against Turnitin.com filed by several Virginia high school students, alleging that the anti-plagiarism service violated the students’ intellectual property rights. Then, I said, “Does Turnitin have a valid defense? There are two likely possibilities: fair use, and license.” My predictions (unlike, say, my stock picks) […]

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The Oregon Attorney General’s Office has asked a federal court to require the RIAA to tell the state who is downloading information from computers belonging to students at the University of Oregon. In proceedings to determine whether the University must reveal the names of its students in response to the ex parte subpoena issued by […]

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Of the twenty-thousand or so (I’ve heard higher) people who have been sued by the RIAA in the past four years for file-sharing, not one has ever gone to trial before this week. But this week in Duluth, Minnestoa, Capitol Records, et al v. Jammie Thomas is just about to go to the jury. Several […]

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I’ve got three: Rage Against the Machine: RIAA Litigation Update The recording industry has ramped up its litigation campaign against peer-to-peer file sharing suspects, with cases now numbering in the high thousands. This session explores recent developments in the various cases nationwide and how someone caught in this driftnet litigation might defend themselves. Among Thieves: […]

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